F.A.C.T. Parenting Association
Questions for the next governing party in Canada

  1. Canadians have expressed concerns with the post-divorce situation of children. In Compas and Angus-Reid polls, in the report of the Special Joint Senate-Commons Committee on Custody and Access, and even recently in the Department of Justices own internal focus group study conducted by Sage Research ("Family Law Issues Related to Custody and Access Focus Groups", dated March 31, 2000), an over-wheliming number of Canadians believe that changes are required to the current practices to ensure both parents are involved in the lives of their children after divorce or separation. They believe that only proven instability or unreliability should be a consideration for not doing so. An estimated 100,000 additional children a year become entangled in divorce/separation.

    What does you party believe needs to be done for the children of divorce and separation and, if you believe changes are required, how and when do you plan to proceed?

  2. Domestic violence accusations, rarely prosecuted let alone proven, have long been a tool in Canadian family law and criminal courts to block the interaction of non-custodial parents to their children. Studies show that most violence is mutual, and what is not is effectively split equally between men and women. Irrespective of violence between parents, the separation of children from either parents has been shown to be severely damaging to the children. Certainly, the long term negative impact on children of this type of enforced separation has been shown, through HRDC-sponsored studies, to result in serious psychological and sociological problems in up to 80% of these children.

    How would your party deal with the court system and protecting children from the current handling of these accusation, and the imbalance of power of a women's accusations? If you believe changes are required, how and when do you plan to proceed?

  3. It is estimated that 50% of the children who are now reaching their child-bearing years are not living with at least one of their biological parents. It is further estimated that about 25% of all children now reaching their child-bearing years have not had contact with both their parents over 5-10 years. As a result, these children have been shown to have little idea of how to run a family, how to parent, or how to maintain a relationship. Due to the current situations affecting divorce and separation, it is anticipated in the next generation of children more than 50% will be in this situation.

    Is this a problem? If changess are required, what does your party intend to do, and when would you plan to proceed?

  4. The fertility rate in Canada is, and has been since the 1980's, about 1.59 live births per woman. This is significantly lower than the replacement ratio to keep the population steady (2.1 live births) or of our neighbours (the US is at about 2.05 live births). The current Canadian population is therefore shrinking in numbers at a rate of about 25% per generation as Canadian choose not to bring children into this current social environment.

    Is this a problem? If changess are required, what does your party intend to do, and when would you plan to proceed?